Postgraduate Research Programmes

Postgraduate Research Programmes

Doctor of Philosophy
All subject areas in the College support PhD study. Interdisciplinary study across subject areas is also welcomed. The normal length of study for a PhD is 3 years full-time and 5 years part-time.

Students undertaking a PhD are expected to produce original work that makes a significant contribution to knowledge in, or understanding of, a field of study. A PhD thesis is 70,000 – 100,000 words or agreed equivalent (if comprised of applied or creative components).

PhD students in the College are allocated two academic supervisors to support them in their research.

Master of Letters (Research)
All subject areas in the College support MLitt (Research) study. Interdisciplinary study across subject areas is also welcomed. The normal length of study for a MLitt (Research) is 2 years full-time and 3 years part-time.

Students undertaking an MLitt (Research) are expected to make a significant contribution to knowledge in, or understanding of a field of study. The MLitt thesis is between 40,000 and 70,000 words or agreed equivalent (if comprised of applied or creative components).

Master of Philosophy (Research)
Most subjects in the College of Arts support an MPhil (Research) programme of study (MMus in Music and MTh in Theology and Religious Studies). The normal length of study for the MPhil (Research) is 1 year full-time and 2 years part-time.

Students undertaking an MPhil (Research) are expected to make a distinct contribution to knowledge in the field of study. The thesis is between 30,000 and 40,000 words or agreed equivalent (if comprised of applied or creative components).

Master of Research (Taught and Research)
The College of Arts also offers MRes in some subject areas. The MRes in Arts is a flexible programme offering a combination of taught and research components. It allows you to acquire the specialist knowledge and research necessary to complete a substantial dissertation, preparing you for doctoral study, while standing as a qualification in its own right.

The MRes is assessed primarily by a dissertation on a topic of your choice, with additional assessed taught courses in research methods and specialised subjects directly related to your proposed dissertation topic. You can take between 60 and 90 credits of taught courses and a corresponding number of credits for the dissertation (between 90 and 120 credits). The length of your dissertation will be between 18,000 and 30,000 words. Your dissertation project will be supported by at least one academic supervisor and you may have access to some of the Graduate School's skills development workshops.